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CONTAINER Introduction 
 
1 Portal See Gate (2) Solution 
 
 
BROCHURES
 

ContainerBrochures.pdf

SeeGateInformation.pdf

SeeGateNewDesign.pdf

SeeGateInstall.pdf

SeeUtilities AA 06.pdf

SmartService.pdf

 
 
 
License Plate Recognition
 
Choice of applications
 
See Car app
 
SeeCAR Product LINE
 
Train / Rail
 
Weigh bridge integration
 
Plane
 
LPR DLL
 
LPR cameras
 
LPR BROCHURES
 
Overview
 
See LANE
 
Applications:
 
1 Portal See Gate (2) Solution 
 
Container Recognition
 
 
 
Hyster Recognition
 
VEHICLE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM
 
Weigh Bridges
 
SAB weigh bridges
 
Machine Vision
 
 
Aggregate ID using Image Analysis by I-Cube
 
Image Analysis/Processing Workstations
Sugar Imaging
 
Stockpile Volume Calculation

Hardware Vendors

Counting & Sizing
 
Smoke Monitoring
Camera Vendors
 
 
Where to Buy
 
 
 
Support
 

SeeGateInformation.pdf

SeeGateNewDesign.pdf

SeeGateInstall.pdf

SeeUtilities AA 06.pdf

SmartService.pdf

 SeeContainer SystemTechnical Information
 
 
LPR Demo user manual
 
LPR USER MANUALS
 
HTSOL DLL 
 

DEMOS

 LPR Demo of RSA Customised Plates. zip (3 MB)

 LPR TRAP (ZIP 3 MB)

 LPR SA DEMO (1 MB)

 SPEED DETERMINATION DEMO (2 MB)

SeeLane Install V6.1

Mobile LPR Player

 
Contact Us
 
Feed Back
 
 
News 
 
SARS looks to fast-track customs clearance
 
Harbour clogged by snail rail
 
Delays under control says port
 
SmartGate to proceed next February
 
 
I-Cube Intro Brochure

Automated License Plate Recognition (ALPR) for Law Enforcement

KZN gets high-tech speed cameras

High Tech Crime Fighting

New speed monitoring system tested

Road Block LPR Solutions

Reference Sites
 
Particulars of LPR projects carried out successfully
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Home
 
I-Cube advantage
  
Products
 
CONTAINER Introduction 
 
1 Portal See Gate (2) Solution 
 
 
BROCHURES
 

ContainerBrochures.pdf

SeeGateInformation.pdf

SeeGateNewDesign.pdf

SeeGateInstall.pdf

SeeUtilities AA 06.pdf

SmartService.pdf

 
 
 
License Plate Recognition
 
Choice of applications
 
See Car app
 
SeeCAR Product LINE
 
Train / Rail
 
Weigh bridge integration
 
Plane
 
LPR DLL
 
LPR cameras
 
LPR BROCHURES
 
Overview
 
See LANE
 
Applications:
 
1 Portal See Gate (2) Solution 
 
Container Recognition
 
 
 
Hyster Recognition
 
VEHICLE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM
 
Weigh Bridges
 
SAB weigh bridges
 
Machine Vision
 
 
Aggregate ID using Image Analysis by I-Cube
 
Image Analysis/Processing Workstations
Sugar Imaging
 
Stockpile Volume Calculation

Hardware Vendors

Counting & Sizing
 
Smoke Monitoring
Camera Vendors
 
 
Where to Buy
 
 
 
Support
 

SeeGateInformation.pdf

SeeGateNewDesign.pdf

SeeGateInstall.pdf

SeeUtilities AA 06.pdf

SmartService.pdf

 SeeContainer SystemTechnical Information
 
 
LPR Demo user manual
 
LPR USER MANUALS
 
HTSOL DLL 
 

DEMOS

 LPR Demo of RSA Customised Plates. zip (3 MB)

 LPR TRAP (ZIP 3 MB)

 LPR SA DEMO (1 MB)

 SPEED DETERMINATION DEMO (2 MB)

SeeLane Install V6.1

Mobile LPR Player

 
Contact Us
 
Feed Back
 
 
News 
 
SARS looks to fast-track customs clearance
 
Harbour clogged by snail rail
 
Delays under control says port
 
SmartGate to proceed next February
 
 
I-Cube Intro Brochure

Automated License Plate Recognition (ALPR) for Law Enforcement

KZN gets high-tech speed cameras

High Tech Crime Fighting

New speed monitoring system tested

Road Block LPR Solutions

Reference Sites
 
Particulars of LPR projects carried out successfully
 
 
 

 

 
 

 

SEE CONTAINER SYSTEM   NEWS
Delays under control, says port
March 29, 2007

By Samantha Enslin

Durban - SA Port Operations (Sapo) claims that delays for ships waiting to dock at the Durban container terminal will be back to normal by this weekend, but shipping lines consider this to be overly optimistic.

The delays were caused by the closure of the port following severe weather early last week.

Solly Letsoalo, Sapo's chief operating officer, said yesterday: "By this weekend, the backlog will be clear and delays will be back to normal."

The normal target is that delays to berth at the Durban container terminal should not exceed 16 hours. Yesterday there were 10 vessels waiting to berth with average delays of between 11 and 14 hours, Letsoalo said.

Dave Rennie, the chairman of the Container Liners Operators' Forum, said: "That is fairly optimistic. I am not sure where Sapo is getting its figures from. The average delay to berth is three to four days, with some vessels waiting up to six days."

Letsoalo said ensuring that importers collected containers to clear space while the port was closed had helped the terminal to cope with recent delays.

Sapo is also confident that its additional capacity will enable it to cope with the peak period from August to November.

Letsoalo said Sapo was forecasting an increase of up to 15 percent in container volumes during this period.

The container terminal handled a monthly peak of 189 000 twenty-foot equivalents units (TEUs) last November. Last year, it handled more than its installed capacity of 1.9 million TEUs.

By May, new container handling capacity at Pier One will be available, and the terminal has been increasing its workforce and training staff so it is better able to handle unforeseen problems.

Letsoalo said the staff complement had risen from about 900 to 1 500 in the past two years. The terminal now has 14 gangs working cranes at a time, which will rise to 16 gangs by the end of July.

"This means that 6 000 containers can be handled a day from 4 000," he said.

Shipping lines had also been asked to stack containers in a configuration enabling three cranes to work the vessel simultaneously rather than two.

This would reduce the time ships needed to spend in port.

Since November, the local subsidiary of Sri Lankan firm PMCS has been training terminal staff. There are 65 Sri Lankans on site, with 42 doing the jobs of terminal staff while they are in training.

Letsoalo would not disclose the cost of the 12-month contract.
 

MORE NEWS....

SeeContainer product Line.htm

Harbour clogged by snail rail.htm

SARS looks to fast-track customs clearance.htm

Freight Haul Container Recognition.html

SeeContainer SystemTechnical Information.htm

SeeContainer for Freight Haul.pdf

SmartGate to proceed next February.html

Neural networks to enhance safety in local authorities automatic identification tracking and alarm.html

Apparatus and method for container recognition.html

Ramos resolves to win freight back from the roads.html

Road freight more efficient than rail.html

Customs and Border Protection.html

Durban - the port that needs to expand.html

100 percent container scanning law.html

worldwide surge in containerisation.html

Rail industry.html

SeeContainer Container Code Recognition (CCR) Product line consists of recognition systems and software that tracks, reads and checks Shipping Container identification markings.

The SeeContainer product line configurations are:


 SeeGate : Stand alone system, which recognizes the Container(s) ID, the truck plate and optionally the Wagon/Chassis numbers. In this configuration (as in the above photo) the system interfaces to the cameras and sensors, processes the information and outputs the results via Windows DDE messages to other Windows applications, log file or network.

 SeeCrane : Crane identification system; automatically reads and records the container ISO code number as it is handled by a crane.

 SeeTrain: Container recognition system on single rail tracks, for Terminal portals, and slow/medium speed trains. The system reads container codes on single or double stack levels, and also reads railcar RFID tags.

 SeeRail: Containers on multiple track double-stacked fast speed train, for intermodal installations.

 

Order for World's largest port recognition project was successfully supplied in 2002 to a Container Terminal operator in California, USA. The project includes 56 SeeGate systems which perform Truck, Container and Chassis Identification. This installation followed an installation and order for 29 Portal and Pedestal recognition systems received from another Terminal operator Company (some of the lanes shown above), and 10 SeeCrane systems.

   Additionally, new orders are now being installed in 7 additional terminals - with over 250 Portal and Pedestal SeeGate systems, 49 SeeCrane systems and several SeeTrain systems.

This total number of recognition systems makes Hi-Tech Solutions a Worldwide leader in the number of installed systems, as well as proven quality and experience.

 

The SeeContainer products integration and hierarchy is shown in the following illustration. It consists of four levels in bottom up order: hardware (specialized cameras and illumination units, sensors and more), libraries (Windows or Linux), applications (e.g., SeeGate) and database/networking (SeeData). The blocks in each level are products or components that we offer. The top fifth level is a set of possible customer applications and systems that can utilize the building blocks offered by the product line.

Most applications are customer specific and need some level of adaptation. We supply full tools and components to simplify the adaptation to the site-specific requirements.

  We also offer a set of Networking and Maintenance Utilities that provide additional tools for building applications, maintaining and operating them.

 


News...

 SeeRail - order for hi-speed multi-track intermodal rail systems, part of a non-invasive cargo container recognition and tracking system (posted: June 2004). See image on right.

 

 SeeTrain - new system: reads containers on trains in terminal gates (posted: Jan 2004). See image on right.

 

 SeeCrane - 49 (!) crane-mounted container recognition systems ordered in 7 USA terminals  (posted: Aug 2003).

 

 SeeGate - Over 250 (!) SeeGate portal and pedestal container recognition systems ordered   (posted: Aug 2003).

 

See also related video clips and press reports on the SeeContainer projects.

 

 

 

 

 SeeContainer Product line Overview:                       

 Datasheet , Photo Gallery

 SeeGate Recognition system

Datasheet -or- Technical manual -or- Web Page

-or-

 Spanish Technical manual.

 SeeCrane system:

Datasheet -or-  Web Page

 

 SeeTrain/SeeRail systems:

Web Page

 

 Networking and Maintenance utilities that support the product line (SeeMonitor, SeeService, SeeCleaner, SeeData, SeeCal):    

Web Page

 

Port Maputo aims to pick up the slack and get bigger
June 26, 2007

By SAMANTHA ENSLIN-PAYNE

Durban - Port Maputo, with R2 billion of investments in the pipeline, is slowly positioning itself as a viable alternative to the Durban harbour for Gauteng's importers and exporters.

But it is only recently that the port has begun to realise its potential. In the past few years upgrades have boosted its volumes from about 3 million tons in 1997 to 6.5 million tons last year.

But there is still some way to go.

Dick Moore, commercial director at the Maputo Port Development Company (MPDC), said last week the port's ultimate capacity was in excess of 18 million tons a year.

Moore said this could be realised only if rail services from South Africa were substantially improved and if the Komatipoort border post between South Africa and Mozambique was open 24 hours a day.

"In its heyday, Port Maputo, or Lourenço Marques as it was called until independence in 1976, was the equal of Durban and known by seamen from all over the world," Moore said.

Port Maputo has some advantages over the Durban port, South Africa's busiest harbour, where more than 4 000 vessels dock a year.

By rail the port is 581km from City Deep in Johannesburg, while Durban is 720km from City Deep.

So MPDC's main task, when it took over management of the port in 2003, was to repair and modernise the port, which suffered from "extreme lack of maintenance over the long years of the civil war'', Moore said.

About R455 million was spent on dredging and upgrading roads and rail.

New communications and computer systems, administrative and commercial structures were also introduced.

All of this enabled the port to implement the same around-the-clock operations as any international port and trade started picking up.

Last year 690 ships called at Maputo, carrying 6.5 million tons of cargo - "the port's best performance in more than in 25 years", Moore said.

South African cargo comprised 56 percent of all exports from Port Maputo.

Swaziland, Zimbabwe and Botswana shippers also use the port.

Port Maputo has five cargo terminals, which include bulk and bagged sugar, containers, and citrus.

Six kilometres further upstream are the Matola bulk terminals, which handle coal, petroleum, aluminium and grain.

The Matola coal terminal, in which Grindrod has a 95 percent stake, is close to completing a project to double annual capacity to 3 million tons. In the next few years this will double again to 6 million tons.

A new terminal for bagged sugar opened in January, while the bulk sugar terminal was expanded last year.

MIPS, which operates the container terminal, has invested $12 million (R86 million) in upgrades.

The terminal is primarily used by Mozambican importers, but has some excess capacity that could be taken up by South African shippers.
Click here!


Projects under way include a $16 million redevelopment of the fresh produce terminal, which is due to be operational next year.

A new car terminal, which will be completed by December. is also being developed by Grindrod.

The port will be boosted by a new R4.2 billion refined product pipeline, which, subject to environmental approval, will be able to transport refined fuel to Gauteng by the end of 2009.

Moore said that beyond this, further expansion would be done through the reclamation of land.

In contrast, Durban, which is under severe pressure to expand as volumes in cars and containers soar, has almost nowhere to go.

But Maputo also has its disadvantages. For instance, some of its terminals have less capacity than Durban, which last year handled about 41 million tons of cargo.

The Durban container terminal handles 2.3 million twenty foot equivalent units (teus) a year, compared with the 100 000 teus capacity at Maputo port.

But capacity can be increased as demand grows. The trick, however, is to do it ahead of the game and not be caught short.

Dave Rennie, chief executive of Grindrod Freight Services, said last week that the Maputo car terminal, which will have an initial annual throughput capacity of 63 000 units, could be upgraded relatively quickly to handle as many as 250 000 units.

The introduction of a 24-hour, single border post between South Africa and Mozambique at Komatipoort, which is on the cards, will alleviate delays.

Rail has also received attention. The Mozambican rail operator, CFM, would complete a $12 million upgrade of the Ressano Garcia railway linking Maputo with Spoornet's system in South Africa.

Moore said: "MPDC expects at least another 1 million tons per annum of valuable South African exports to reach the port on this … improved railway during 2007."

New developments have already sparked the interest of shipping lines.

Höegh Autoliners, which transports about 220 000 car equivalent units a year to and from South Africa, has expressed frustration with the congested car terminal in Durban. Per Folkesson, managing director of Höegh Autoliners in Africa, said last week that in light of the costly inefficiencies in the Durban port, an alternative car terminal at Maputo would be welcome.

Of course, investment is also being ploughed into Durban and the numbers are a lot bigger.

Transnet is investing R2 billion in Pier One, an additional container handling facility that will increase the port's annual capacity by 720 000 teus.

The widening of the entrance to the Durban port to accommodate larger vessels is expected to cost about R3 billion and is expected to be completed in 2011

 

I-Cube.   All rights reserved.  Revised: February 05, 2008 .