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CONTAINER Introduction 
 
1 Portal See Gate (2) Solution 
 
 
BROCHURES
 

ContainerBrochures.pdf

SeeGateInformation.pdf

SeeGateNewDesign.pdf

SeeGateInstall.pdf

SeeUtilities AA 06.pdf

SmartService.pdf

 
 
 
License Plate Recognition
 
Choice of applications
 
See Car app
 
SeeCAR Product LINE
 
Train / Rail
 
Weigh bridge integration
 
Plane
 
LPR DLL
 
LPR cameras
 
LPR BROCHURES
 
Overview
 
See LANE
 
Applications:
 
1 Portal See Gate (2) Solution 
 
Container Recognition
 
 
 
Hyster Recognition
 
VEHICLE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM
 
Weigh Bridges
 
SAB weigh bridges
 
Machine Vision
 
 
Aggregate ID using Image Analysis by I-Cube
 
Image Analysis/Processing Workstations
Sugar Imaging
 
Stockpile Volume Calculation

Hardware Vendors

Counting & Sizing
 
Smoke Monitoring
Camera Vendors
 
 
Where to Buy
 
 
 
Support
 

SeeGateInformation.pdf

SeeGateNewDesign.pdf

SeeGateInstall.pdf

SeeUtilities AA 06.pdf

SmartService.pdf

 SeeContainer SystemTechnical Information
 
 
LPR Demo user manual
 
LPR USER MANUALS
 
HTSOL DLL 
 

DEMOS

 LPR Demo of RSA Customised Plates. zip (3 MB)

 LPR TRAP (ZIP 3 MB)

 LPR SA DEMO (1 MB)

 SPEED DETERMINATION DEMO (2 MB)

SeeLane Install V6.1

Mobile LPR Player

 
Contact Us
 
Feed Back
 
 
News 
 
SARS looks to fast-track customs clearance
 
Harbour clogged by snail rail
 
Delays under control says port
 
SmartGate to proceed next February
 
 
I-Cube Intro Brochure

Automated License Plate Recognition (ALPR) for Law Enforcement

KZN gets high-tech speed cameras

High Tech Crime Fighting

New speed monitoring system tested

Road Block LPR Solutions

Reference Sites
 
Particulars of LPR projects carried out successfully
 
 
 

 

 
Home
 
I-Cube advantage
  
Products
 
CONTAINER Introduction 
 
1 Portal See Gate (2) Solution 
 
 
BROCHURES
 

ContainerBrochures.pdf

SeeGateInformation.pdf

SeeGateNewDesign.pdf

SeeGateInstall.pdf

SeeUtilities AA 06.pdf

SmartService.pdf

 
 
 
License Plate Recognition
 
Choice of applications
 
See Car app
 
SeeCAR Product LINE
 
Train / Rail
 
Weigh bridge integration
 
Plane
 
LPR DLL
 
LPR cameras
 
LPR BROCHURES
 
Overview
 
See LANE
 
Applications:
 
1 Portal See Gate (2) Solution 
 
Container Recognition
 
 
 
Hyster Recognition
 
VEHICLE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM
 
Weigh Bridges
 
SAB weigh bridges
 
Machine Vision
 
 
Aggregate ID using Image Analysis by I-Cube
 
Image Analysis/Processing Workstations
Sugar Imaging
 
Stockpile Volume Calculation

Hardware Vendors

Counting & Sizing
 
Smoke Monitoring
Camera Vendors
 
 
Where to Buy
 
 
 
Support
 

SeeGateInformation.pdf

SeeGateNewDesign.pdf

SeeGateInstall.pdf

SeeUtilities AA 06.pdf

SmartService.pdf

 SeeContainer SystemTechnical Information
 
 
LPR Demo user manual
 
LPR USER MANUALS
 
HTSOL DLL 
 

DEMOS

 LPR Demo of RSA Customised Plates. zip (3 MB)

 LPR TRAP (ZIP 3 MB)

 LPR SA DEMO (1 MB)

 SPEED DETERMINATION DEMO (2 MB)

SeeLane Install V6.1

Mobile LPR Player

 
Contact Us
 
Feed Back
 
 
News 
 
SARS looks to fast-track customs clearance
 
Harbour clogged by snail rail
 
Delays under control says port
 
SmartGate to proceed next February
 
 
I-Cube Intro Brochure

Automated License Plate Recognition (ALPR) for Law Enforcement

KZN gets high-tech speed cameras

High Tech Crime Fighting

New speed monitoring system tested

Road Block LPR Solutions

Reference Sites
 
Particulars of LPR projects carried out successfully
 
 
 

 

 
NEWS
NEWS SEE CONTAINER SYSTEM   
Harbour clogged by snail rail
November 17, 2006

By Samantha Enslin

Durban - Poor rail service between Durban and Gauteng has seen a huge build-up of containers on the dockside, with goods taking anything up to two weeks to reach the Highveld.

Vishnu Reddy, the managing director of Railroad Africa, said yesterday: "The Durban container terminal is congested not because more containers are coming into the country but because there is no way of evacuating containers from the terminal by rail. Containers sit for 14 to 15 days."

The delays, which have increased recently, have put importers of consumer goods stocking up ahead of Christmas in a fix.

Reddy said: "At the peak season ahead of Christmas my customers importing clothing and consumer goods are waiting indefinitely." Spoornet did not respond to repeated attempts to get comment yesterday.

The delays on rail come after the recent problems at the Durban container terminal, which saw shipping lines having to wait up to 70 hours to berth. Last week Transnet and shipping lines said the situation had improved, where ships were now berthing after 16 hours. But rail is causing further problems.

Previously Spoornet has said additional rail capacity on the Johannesburg to Durban corridor has cut the time it takes to rail from 22 hours to 17 hours. However, the shortage of equipment meant containers wait up to two weeks before getting on to rail, intermodal operators said.

Siyabonga Gama, Spoornet's chief executive, said in September that planned investment in general freight rail was expected to see tonnage rise from 2008. The R10.8 billion five-year investment for general freight would need to be upwardly revised as more locomotives would be needed than initially planned.

About R2.7 billion will be spent on the Gauteng to Durban route. The time to rail is expected to drop to about 14 hours when the current five trains a day on this route will increase to 11 trains. This is expected by the end of the year. "We are upping the ante. In 2008 you will see a significant increase in containers going on rail. We can expect fireworks."

But intermodal operators, who liaise with Spoornet on behalf of customers who import and export containerised goods, say they have heard it all before.

Richard Foulds, an executive director at Cross Country Containers, a Grindrod subsidiary, said yesterday: "We spend our lives with the ongoing irritation of Spoornet. Spoornet has made capital commitments so we sincerely hope there will be an improvement. But it is just something we have to live with, despite the nonsense they talk to the press every year about how they are going to improve."

The majority of shippers use road despite it costing more than rail. Reddy said rail costs were R3 200 for each twenty-foot container railed compared with R5 200 on road.

"I have tried to speak to Spoornet but no one can give me a satisfactory answer on when the situation will improve. There has been a lot of hot air about improvements but we have yet to see them," Reddy said.

 
 

 

 

SeeContainer Container Code Recognition (CCR) Product line consists of recognition systems and software that tracks, reads and checks Shipping Container identification markings.

The SeeContainer product line configurations are:


 SeeGate : Stand alone system, which recognizes the Container(s) ID, the truck plate and optionally the Wagon/Chassis numbers. In this configuration (as in the above photo) the system interfaces to the cameras and sensors, processes the information and outputs the results via Windows DDE messages to other Windows applications, log file or network.

 SeeCrane : Crane identification system; automatically reads and records the container ISO code number as it is handled by a crane.

 SeeTrain: Container recognition system on single rail tracks, for Terminal portals, and slow/medium speed trains. The system reads container codes on single or double stack levels, and also reads railcar RFID tags.

 SeeRail: Containers on multiple track double-stacked fast speed train, for intermodal installations.

 

Order for World's largest port recognition project was successfully supplied in 2002 to a Container Terminal operator in California, USA. The project includes 56 SeeGate systems which perform Truck, Container and Chassis Identification. This installation followed an installation and order for 29 Portal and Pedestal recognition systems received from another Terminal operator Company (some of the lanes shown above), and 10 SeeCrane systems.

   Additionally, new orders are now being installed in 7 additional terminals - with over 250 Portal and Pedestal SeeGate systems, 49 SeeCrane systems and several SeeTrain systems.

This total number of recognition systems makes Hi-Tech Solutions a Worldwide leader in the number of installed systems, as well as proven quality and experience.

 

SA PORTS PROJECTS

Durban harbour expansion to answer future freight demands

The expansion of the Durban harbour is necessary to provide capacity and to meet future freight demands in the interests of the eThekwini municipality and South Africa. This is the view of State parastatal Transnet and the municipality, which form part of a joint initiative referred to as the Transnet-eThekwini Municipality Planning Initiative (Tempi). A newsletter released by the municipality in May 2007 said that the development of the Port of Durban must be sustainable and balance social, environmental and economic benefits.



The Durban port upgrade is part of an R11-billion port infrastructure upgrade across 13 terminals in six ports in South Africa, which is the result of a growing maritime industry and unexpected growth in containerised cargo shipping.



The upgrade of the Port of Durban involved the development of Pier One as a container-handling facility, to accommodate a yearly capacity of 600 000 twenty-foot-equivalent units. Other projects identified by the National Ports Authority, include the widening and deepening of the Durban harbour mouth, the upgrading of Island View berths five and six, and the upgrading of the Maydon Wharf terminal that will entail new commercial leases, the replacement of quay walls, rationalising and upgrading rail and road infrastructure, and upgrading security and access. Further projects include the Bayhead digout project, which will add a large amount of water area to the bay, while creating two large container terminals on either side of the basin.



The Tempi project has been concluded and explored critical planning issues, which concentrated on the economic, engineering, environ- mental, traffic and transport, and port and precinct planning. This project was an initiative from Tempi representatives with the assistance of specialist consultants. However, the newsletter released by the municipality, said that further detailed planning work and studies through participation with respective parties would continue as part of the regulatory process required in any port development.



TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT

A new access control system was installed at the Durban container terminal (DCT), in May this year, to enhance the International Ship and Port Facility Security code, with the aim of complying with international standards.



State-owned ports operator, the South African Port Operations (Sapo) business risk, corporate governance and legal GM Pru Archary says, “The introduction of the new access control system by Sapo, an operating division of Transnet, is intended to create a safe environment for all terminal users.”



She adds, “The project is aimed at positioning South African ports in line with international best practice and ensuring security is non-negotiable and everyone’s business.”



In his address at the 19th National Maritime Conference, held in April this year, National Minister of Transport Jeff Radebe, echoed similar sentiments and said that complying with international secu- rity conventions was necessary and that issues of safety and security were to be prioritised as the South African maritime industry grows.



The new system is a pilot project and will manage access to the DCT. This will be accomplished by the introduction of a shuttle ser-vice for all terminal users, excluding truck drivers. The shuttle service will restrict illegal access to the terminal. Permits will be issued to all terminal visitors and all visits will have to be preannounced. The pick-up and drop-off zones will be signposted for different terminal users and will be divided into categories for the use of stevedores, customers and other terminal users.



Meanwhile, a high-tech weighbridge facility has been introduced at Sapo’s Maydon Wharf terminal, repositioning the terminal as a one-stop shop facility. The terminal will provide ser-vices such as weighing, storage, handling, loading and offloading.



Maydon Wharf business unit executive Tracey Neat says, “The new facility is in line with Sapo’s strategic objective to meet and exceed customer expectations by providing highly advanced systems and equipment to promote effici-ency and high performance.”



The advantages of the weighbridge facility include ensuring transparency when declaring cargo and a more efficient and faster weighing process. It also allows cargo owners or terminals to track the cargo as the system has a GeneChip, which is software compliant. This facility ensures accurate weighing of cargo at points of loading and offloading and reduces the risk to equipment, people and the environment. It also prevents damage to roads as trucks are not overloaded.



The environmental-impact assessment on the Bayhead expansion will start later this year and is expected to be completed over a period of about two years. The cost of this project is esti-mated at R25-billion. The final stage of the sheet wall was expected to be completed by April this year. The construction is being fasttracked to alleviate congestion at the DCT and the expected completion date is August 2007.



In April this year, employees at the Pier One container terminal received training in preparation for the reopening of the high-performance terminal. This terminal will feature Navis, a new computer system and rubber-tyred-gantry (RTG) operations. Pier One was temporarily closed in December 2006 to create additional capacity of about 720 000 transport equivalent units by the end of 2007. The training of Pier One container terminal employees and infrastructure and superstructure form part of Sapo’s strategic objective of creating capacity before demand.



Operations resumed at the end of May and Pier One will start up with one berth, two ship-to-shore (STS) gantry cranes and RTG cranes. The RTG operations and equipment, which have been commissioned and tested by the respective operators, will be used for the first time in the country.



The 42 TRG operators and 15 STS operators have been trained by a team of experts from Sri Lanka and have received extensive practical and academic experience. Sapo says that other developments that will add to the terminal’s increased efficiency is the establishment of a new rail termi- nal, which is currently under construction and will promote seamless operations with rail and sea transport.



Contractors appointed on the Durban port upgrade include construction group Protekon, structural engineering and contracting company DSE, South African engineering contractor Basil read, carrier straddle manufacturers Kalmar Industries and a joint initiative between construction groups Grinaker-LTA, Interbeton and Bafokeng Civil Works.


 

 

The SeeContainer products integration and hierarchy is shown in the following illustration. It consists of four levels in bottom up order: hardware (specialized cameras and illumination units, sensors and more), libraries (Windows or Linux), applications (e.g., SeeGate) and database/networking (SeeData). The blocks in each level are products or components that we offer. The top fifth level is a set of possible customer applications and systems that can utilize the building blocks offered by the product line.

Most applications are customer specific and need some level of adaptation. We supply full tools and components to simplify the adaptation to the site-specific requirements.

  We also offer a set of Networking and Maintenance Utilities that provide additional tools for building applications, maintaining and operating them.

 


News...

MORE NEWS....

SeeContainer product Line.htm

Harbour clogged by snail rail.htm

SARS looks to fast-track customs clearance.htm

Freight Haul Container Recognition.html

SeeContainer SystemTechnical Information.htm

SeeContainer for Freight Haul.pdf

SmartGate to proceed next February.html

Neural networks to enhance safety in local authorities automatic identification tracking and alarm.html

Apparatus and method for container recognition.html

Ramos resolves to win freight back from the roads.html

Road freight more efficient than rail.html

Customs and Border Protection.html

Durban - the port that needs to expand.html

100 percent container scanning law.html

worldwide surge in containerisation.html

Rail industry.html

 

 SeeRail - order for hi-speed multi-track intermodal rail systems, part of a non-invasive cargo container recognition and tracking system (posted: June 2004). See image on right.

 

 SeeTrain - new system: reads containers on trains in terminal gates (posted: Jan 2004). See image on right.

 

 SeeCrane - 49 (!) crane-mounted container recognition systems ordered in 7 USA terminals  (posted: Aug 2003).

 

 SeeGate - Over 250 (!) SeeGate portal and pedestal container recognition systems ordered   (posted: Aug 2003).

 

See also related video clips and press reports on the SeeContainer projects.

 

 

 

 

 SeeContainer Product line Overview:                       

 Datasheet , Photo Gallery

 SeeGate Recognition system

Datasheet -or- Technical manual -or- Web Page

-or-

 Spanish Technical manual.

 SeeCrane system:

Datasheet -or-  Web Page

 

 SeeTrain/SeeRail systems:

Web Page

 

 Networking and Maintenance utilities that support the product line (SeeMonitor, SeeService, SeeCleaner, SeeData, SeeCal):    

Web Page

 

 

I-Cube.   All rights reserved.  Revised: February 05, 2008 .